Agreements To Reduce Climate Change

Agreements To Reduce Climate Change

By quantifying the damage done to society by CO2 pollution, Trump sees America as an island apart – and we all know what climate change is doing to the islands. Paris Agreement, 2015. The most important global agreement to date, the Paris Agreement, obliges all countries to make commitments to reduce emissions. Governments set targets known as national contributions, with a view to preventing the average global temperature from rising by 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to strive to keep it below 1.5 degrees Celsius. It also aims to achieve zero net emissions globally, where the amount of greenhouse gases emitted is equivalent to the amount removed from the atmosphere in the second half of the century. (This is also called climate neutral or carbon neutral.) In the run-up to the 1997 COP3 conference in Kyoto, Japan, developing countries (global south) and industrialized countries (global north) expressed different perspectives on their relative responsibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. An influential article (Agarwal and Narain, 1991) is a common argument in developing countries: the World Bank (2010)[120] commented on how the Kyoto Protocol had only a small impact on controlling global emissions growth. The treaty was negotiated in 1997, but by 2006 energy-related carbon dioxide emissions had increased by 24%. [121] The World Bank (2010) also stated that the treaty had provided only limited financial assistance to developing countries to help them reduce their emissions and adapt to climate change.

[120] “This is a challenge that requires a 100% effort; and the rest of the world. The world`s second largest emitter of greenhouse gases is the People`s Republic of China. Nevertheless, China has been completely exempt from the requirements of the Kyoto Protocol. India and Germany are among the main emitters. But India was also excluded from Kyoto… America`s reluctance to accept a flawed treaty should not be read by our friends and allies as an abandonment of responsibility. On the contrary, my government is committed to leadership on the issue of climate change… Our approach must be consistent with the long-term goal of stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.┬áThe White House (2001-06-11). President Bush talks about global climate change. Press release. Currently, 197 countries – every nation on earth, the last signatory is war-torn Syria – have adopted the Paris Agreement. 179 of them have consolidated their climate proposals with official approval, including, for the time being, the United States.

The only major emitters that have yet to formally accede to the agreement are Russia, Turkey and Iran. At the same time, the United States has put a particularly hard line in the negotiations, with broad support between the parties. Just before Kyoto, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed the Byrd hail resolution in 1997, saying that the United States should not sign an agreement on climate change, the first does not contain binding targets and timetables for developing and industrialized countries; or 2) which causes economic damage to the United States.


Comments are closed.