Eu Nigeria Readmission Agreement

Eu Nigeria Readmission Agreement

There are also other agreements and memorandums of understanding on readmission. Experience shows that the threat of sanctions has sometimes led to increased cooperation on readmission. As a result, yields have increased only temporarily, with the absolute figures being very low. It is not just about the effectiveness of such a policy. It also thwarts often broader objectives of Europe`s foreign and development policy. This is the case when the threat of sanctions jeopardizes the partnership on an equal footing – partner countries reorient themselves and the EU loses its power of influence. Especially in the context of the Covid 19 pandemic, it is not advisable to reduce partner countries that are not willing to cooperate with funds for development cooperation. This would exacerbate the negative impact of the global recession and the decline in remittances on living conditions in these countries. The EU estimates that about half of irregular migrants on its territory are due to visa overruns. At the same time, the number of applications for short-stay visas and visas issued increased from 12.5 million visas issued in 2010 to 16 million visas and 14.3 million visas in 2018. This is a challenge for discussions on legal mobility channels with third countries, as the EU and its Member States have argued that countries of origin must cooperate on the readmission and return of irregular migrants, in addition to discussions on other channels of legal mobility and the facilitation of visa issuance. In other cases, the leverage of European development cooperation appears to be limited.

For example, negotiations on a readmission agreement in 2016 failed due to Nigeria`s lack of interest. As a result, a vocational training project, funded at 50 million euros by the EUTF, has not been implemented. However, Nigeria does not depend on these development funds, like other countries. Other sources of income play a much larger role. On the one hand, there are remittances from migrants. They represent a much larger share of the state budget than the overall volume of development cooperation. In 2018, for example, transfers to Nigeria amounted to $24.3 billion, while public funding for development cooperation was only $3.3 billion.


Comments are closed.