What Was The Main Goal Of The North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta)

What Was The Main Goal Of The North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta)

From June to the end of August 2018, Canada was sidelined due to bilateral discussions between the United States and Mexico. [137] On August 27, 2018, Mexico and the United States announced that they had reached a bilateral agreement on a revised NAFTA trade agreement, which includes provisions that would boost U.S. auto production[138] a 10-year data protection period against generic drug production on an expanded list of products enjoyed by pharmaceutical companies. , particularly U.S. manufacturers of high-quality bionological drugs. , a sunset clause – a 16-year expiry date with periodic audits over 6 years to eventually extend the contract for an additional 16 years, and a high de minimis threshold, where Mexico increased the de minimis value of US$50 in terms of duty-free and tax-free online purchases to $100. [139] [140] According to an August 30 article in The Economist, Mexico has agreed to increase the rules of origin, which would mean that 75% of a vehicle`s components must be manufactured in North America, as opposed to the previous 62.5%, in order to avoid tariffs. [141] Given that automakers are currently importing cheaper components from Asia, consumers would pay more for vehicles under the revised agreement. [142] In addition, approximately 40 to 45 per cent of vehicle components must be produced by workers earning at least $16 an hour, as opposed to the current $2.30 per hour that a worker earns on average at a Mexican auto plant.

[141] [142] The Economist described this as a “Mexican car construction in a straitjacket”. [141] There is not much that can remain relevant for long periods of time – trade agreements must be constantly renegotiated to remain relevant over time. There is always room for improvement in any legislation, especially at a time when technology is moving as fast as it is. In the end, NAFTA created the framework for trade in North American countries. Although the creation of the Free Trade Agreement has had good and bad results, there is no question of the increase in cross-border trade. In addition, in 1997, the U.S. Industry Classification System (NAICS) was developed by NAFTA countries as a business classification system, which allows for a comparative analysis of business statistics in all three countries. The system is managed by Mexican, Canadian and American organizations – the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia in Mexico, Statistics Canada and the United States Office of Management and Budget. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is an international agreement signed by the governments of Canada, Mexico and the United States that creates a trilateral trade bloc in North America. The agreement came into force on January 1, 1994. NAFTA aims to eliminate all tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade and investment between the United States, Canada and Mexico.

The main provisions of NAFTA required a gradual reduction in tariffs, tariffs and other trade barriers between the three Member States, with some tariffs to be abolished immediately and others over a 15-year period. The agreement guaranteed duty-free access for a wide range of industrial products and goods traded between the signatories. “Domestic goods” have been granted to products imported from other NAFTA countries and prohibit all governments, local or provincial, from imposing taxes or tariffs on these products.


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